The Link Between People And The Sea

News

Nereus Fellow Becca Selden will be joining the Biology faculty at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. She is thrilled to be at this highly prestigious institution to continue her research and help launch the careers of the next generation of women scientists.
Nereus alumnus Gabriel Reygondeau (University of British Columbia - UBC) was chosen to work for the Half Earth Project, and become a UBC-Yale Fellow for his work on global marine species distribution. At UBC and Yale, he will continue his research on "the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities on global ocean biodiversity.”
Nereus Fellow Julia Mason (Stanford University) will serve as a John A. Knauss fellow in Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey's office in Washington D.C. starting in February, where she will work on a variety of important ocean and environmental issues and policies for the upcoming 2019 year.
A workshop on ocean finance co-organized by Nereus Program researchers Robert Blasiak (Stockholm Resilience Centre) and Colette Wabnitz (University of British Columbia) took place on December 6-7, 2018 at the Stockholm Resilience Center. Nereus fellow Robert Blasiak writes about the workshop, which included Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) presenting her recent publication on funding coastal and marine fisheries projects under the climate change regime.
Nereus Research Associate Lydia Teh (University of British Columbia) writes a blog about the Bajau Laut in Malaysia and their struggles with fishing and way of life. She discusses the balance between marine biodiversity conservation and the social side of the Bajau Laut communities, to include securing basic rights such as food, shelter, education, and an adequate standard of living.
Nereus Fellow Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht Univeristy) published the article 'Funding coastal and marine fisheries projects under the climate change regime' in a special issue of Marine Policy on Funding for Ocean Conservation and Sustainable Fisheries. You can read the description and access the full article here.
Nereus Fellow Julia Mason (Stanford University) recently successfully defended her Ph.D. dissertation - 'Who knows and who decides? Incorporating diverse perspectives in fisheries management'. You can read the abstract for it here.
Nereus Fellow Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) will present her paper entitled “Funding coastal and marine fisheries projects under the climate change regime” at a workshop on Ocean Finance at the Stockholm Resilience Center in Sweden. Her paper examines projects related to fisheries which are financed by the four multilateral funds created within the climate change regime.
Nereus Fellow Becca Selden will be joining the Biology faculty at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. She is thrilled to be at this highly prestigious institution to continue her research and help launch the careers of the next generation of women scientists.
Nereus alumnus Gabriel Reygondeau (University of British Columbia - UBC) was chosen to work for the Half Earth Project, and become a UBC-Yale Fellow for his work on global marine species distribution. At UBC and Yale, he will continue his research on "the effects of climate change and anthropogenic activities on global ocean biodiversity.”
Nereus Fellow Julia Mason (Stanford University) will serve as a John A. Knauss fellow in Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey's office in Washington D.C. starting in February, where she will work on a variety of important ocean and environmental issues and policies for the upcoming 2019 year.
A workshop on ocean finance co-organized by Nereus Program researchers Robert Blasiak (Stockholm Resilience Centre) and Colette Wabnitz (University of British Columbia) took place on December 6-7, 2018 at the Stockholm Resilience Center. Nereus fellow Robert Blasiak writes about the workshop, which included Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) presenting her recent publication on funding coastal and marine fisheries projects under the climate change regime.
Nereus Fellow Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht Univeristy) published the article 'Funding coastal and marine fisheries projects under the climate change regime' in a special issue of Marine Policy on Funding for Ocean Conservation and Sustainable Fisheries. You can read the description and access the full article here.
Nereus Fellow Julia Mason (Stanford University) recently successfully defended her Ph.D. dissertation - 'Who knows and who decides? Incorporating diverse perspectives in fisheries management'. You can read the abstract for it here.
Nereus Fellow Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) will present her paper entitled “Funding coastal and marine fisheries projects under the climate change regime” at a workshop on Ocean Finance at the Stockholm Resilience Center in Sweden. Her paper examines projects related to fisheries which are financed by the four multilateral funds created within the climate change regime.
Nereus Fellow Guillermo Ortuño Crespo (Duke University) attended the Climate Impacts on Oceanic Top Predators (CLIOTOP) symposium in Taiwan, where he presented his research on the spatial ecology of pelagic long liners. Guillermo's research was recently published in a special collection in Science Advances on high seas fisheries.
Nereus Research Associate Lydia Teh (University of British Columbia) writes a blog about the Bajau Laut in Malaysia and their struggles with fishing and way of life. She discusses the balance between marine biodiversity conservation and the social side of the Bajau Laut communities, to include securing basic rights such as food, shelter, education, and an adequate standard of living.
Nereus Fellow Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) writes about Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMO) and the challenges they face managing fish stocks, such as non-members fishing in areas under their management and insufficient sustainable and conservation measures. Some RFMOs, such as the South Pacific RFMO, have adopted measures to address these challenges.
School of Marine and Environmental Affairs (SMEA) Masters student Samantha Farquhar (University of Washington) writes about other effective area-based conservation measures (OECMs), as well as other international goals and practices (e.g. Marine Protected Area implementation) that international organizations use to conserve biodiversity, including the skepticism that surrounds their effectiveness.
Nereus fellow Colin Thackray (Harvard University) discusses how toxic methylmercury (MeHg) bioaccumulates within marine food webs, beginning with phytoplankton and zooplankton. This ultimately leads to some larger marine predators, such as fish, having much higher MeHg concentrations than the surrounding seawater.
Nereus fellow Fernando Gonzalez Taboada from Princeton University writes about how the painting 'And They Still Say Fish are Expensive!' by Joaquín Sorolla is still relevant to modern fishing culture and practices, as well as different approaches to predicting future fish abundance in the ocean.
The Blue Economy consists of new marine-based industries that could provide alternatives for isolated or marginalized coastal communities to improve their well-being, and ocean health overall. However, this once equitable and sustainable concept has gradually lost its focus and is shifting toward more conventional industrial development.
The negotiations on the fate of biodiversity in 46% of our planet, or the high seas, have begun. Since the aftermath of World War II, the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic pressures on biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ) have been increasing almost continuously. After almost two decades of discussions about the need to better protect the high seas, the international community mobilized.
What happens when some of the most vulnerable populations on the planet are forced to flee the impacts of climate change without legal backing or clear definition of their rights?

Research

Global Environmental Changes

We are deepening our understanding of the relationship between our changing climate and the human-ocean ecosystem through the study of oceanography, chemistry, ecosystem modeling, applied mathematics and computing.

Marine Resource Management

We engage in applied research with clear policy implications on how humans use ocean resources. Our work hones in on the ecological, socioeconomic, political and cultural factors that shape marine resource use.

Social Equity for Oceans

We are working to address inequity and social injustice in ocean management by studying the socio-cultural implications of environmental changes, conservation burdens of various fisheries policies and socially responsible seafood consumption.

Oceans and Public Health

How are the health and wellbeing of individuals and populations affected by ocean conditions? Applying systems-based approaches, we focus on nutrition, food-security, toxicity and health risk assessments.

Law of the Sea and Governance

We study the legal and political implications of the Law of the Sea and the international ocean governance processes.

About Nereus

Working towards a sustainable future for the ocean and the people who rely on it.

The Nippon Foundation Nereus Program is a global partnership of 17 leading institutes working to advance our comprehensive understanding of the global human-ocean system across the natural and social sciences. Our research spans from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. Since our inception in 2011, we have engaged in innovative, international ocean research.
We pursue sustainability in a way that observes the location, identity, context, and history of the communities we work with as diversities to be embraced rather than differences to be overcome.