The Link Between People And The Sea

News

Nereus fellows Robert Blasiak (Stockholm Resilience Center) and Harriet Harden-Davies (University of Wollongong) both appear in The New York Times article 'What 13,000 Patents Involving the DNA of Sea Life Tell Us About the Future'. Both fellows attended the United Nations debate earlier in September, about the future global legal framework for genetic resources on the high seas, and were interviewed for the article.
University of British Columbia researchers have found that chemical pollutant accumulation in Chinook salmon and southern resident killer whales in the Pacific Northeast Coast region will be exacerbated under climate change. This is yet another anthropogenic stressor that threatens the survivability of the both Chinook salmon and southern resident killer whales.
The Blue Economy consists of new marine-based industries that could to provide alternatives for isolated or marginalized coastal communities to improve their well-being, and ocean health overall. However, this once equitable and sustainable concept has gradually lost its focus and is shifting toward more conventional industrial development.
Nereus PI Laurie Chan and Senior Fellow Tiff-Annie Kenny attended the International Society of Exposure Science and the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology conference (ISES-ISEE 2018) in Ottawa, Canada on August 26th-30th. The conference's focus was on environmental health concerns, and included how scientific and local knowledge combine to assess the impact of contaminated fish consumption on First Nations' health and well-being in Canada.
Nereus Director of Policy, Yoshitaka Ota, gave the keynote lecture at the 20 year anniversary symposium for Satoumi (Japanese coastal restoration) in the Okayama Prefecture in Japan.
The negotiations on the fate of biodiversity in 46% of our planet, or the high seas, have begun. Since the aftermath of World War II, the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic pressures on biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ) have been increasing almost continuously. After almost two decades of discussions about the need to better protect the high seas, the international community mobilized.
Marine heatwaves can cause irreversible ecosystem damage and their frequency has doubled since 1982. If average global temperatures rise 3.5°C, we’ll see a jump from just fewer than four marine heat waves a year on average to a startling 122.
What happens when some of the most vulnerable populations on the planet are forced to flee the impacts of climate change without legal backing or clear definition of their rights?
Nereus fellows Robert Blasiak (Stockholm Resilience Center) and Harriet Harden-Davies (University of Wollongong) both appear in The New York Times article 'What 13,000 Patents Involving the DNA of Sea Life Tell Us About the Future'. Both fellows attended the United Nations debate earlier in September, about the future global legal framework for genetic resources on the high seas, and were interviewed for the article.
University of British Columbia researchers have found that chemical pollutant accumulation in Chinook salmon and southern resident killer whales in the Pacific Northeast Coast region will be exacerbated under climate change. This is yet another anthropogenic stressor that threatens the survivability of the both Chinook salmon and southern resident killer whales.
Nereus PI Laurie Chan and Senior Fellow Tiff-Annie Kenny attended the International Society of Exposure Science and the International Society for Environmental Epidemiology conference (ISES-ISEE 2018) in Ottawa, Canada on August 26th-30th. The conference's focus was on environmental health concerns, and included how scientific and local knowledge combine to assess the impact of contaminated fish consumption on First Nations' health and well-being in Canada.
Nereus Director of Policy, Yoshitaka Ota, gave the keynote lecture at the 20 year anniversary symposium for Satoumi (Japanese coastal restoration) in the Okayama Prefecture in Japan.
Marine heatwaves can cause irreversible ecosystem damage and their frequency has doubled since 1982. If average global temperatures rise 3.5°C, we’ll see a jump from just fewer than four marine heat waves a year on average to a startling 122.
New models developed by Nereus researchers may help reduce this threat by giving regulatory agencies a powerful new tool to predict the month-by-month movements of longline fishing fleets on the high seas. The predictions should help determine where and when the boats will enter waters where by-catch risks are greatest.
Halibut, sole and other flatfish are household names around the world. But that might not always be the case. New paper finds that climate change will drastically reduce flatfish numbers and alter species distributions by hundreds of kilometers by the end of the century.
An international team of researchers has developed a comprehensive set of criteria to help the International Seabed Authority (ISA) protect local biodiversity from deep-sea mining activities. These guidelines should help identify areas of particular environmental importance where no mining should occur.
The Blue Economy consists of new marine-based industries that could to provide alternatives for isolated or marginalized coastal communities to improve their well-being, and ocean health overall. However, this once equitable and sustainable concept has gradually lost its focus and is shifting toward more conventional industrial development.
The negotiations on the fate of biodiversity in 46% of our planet, or the high seas, have begun. Since the aftermath of World War II, the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic pressures on biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction (BBNJ) have been increasing almost continuously. After almost two decades of discussions about the need to better protect the high seas, the international community mobilized.
What happens when some of the most vulnerable populations on the planet are forced to flee the impacts of climate change without legal backing or clear definition of their rights?
On the surface, it’s a joy to see students take ownership of research and form a connection with the ocean. But now, against a backdrop of cuts to programs supporting low-income communities and erosion of policies protecting marine ecosystems, this kind of community-oriented science education is incredibly urgent.
One hundred and twenty five nations gathered from July 9-13 at the Committee on Fisheries meeting at the Food and Agriculture Organization headquarters in Rome, Italy, to examine international fisheries and agriculture issues.
In a Q & A session with Nereus researcher Dr. Richard Caddell, we delve deeper into the policy implications of the projected mass migration of fish towards the poles.
Is the ocean a biological continuum or are there distinct ecological units? Nereus researchers are delving deep into this question, exploring how climate-change will change the answer and untangling what it will all mean for the ocean resources humans rely on across the globe.
Twenty six million tons of seafood, worth $23 billion is illegally caught, unregulated and unreported every year. According to the UN Food and Agricultural Organization, this is a “huge threat to all efforts to bolster sustainable fishing in the world's oceans.”

Research

Global Environmental Changes

We are deepening our understanding of the relationship between our changing climate and the human-ocean ecosystem through the study of oceanography, chemistry, ecosystem modeling, applied mathematics and computing.

Marine Resource Management

We engage in applied research with clear policy implications on how humans use ocean resources. Our work hones in on the ecological, socioeconomic, political and cultural factors that shape marine resource use.

Social Equity for Oceans

We are working to address inequity and social injustice in ocean management by studying the socio-cultural implications of environmental changes, conservation burdens of various fisheries policies and socially responsible seafood consumption.

Oceans and Public Health

How are the health and wellbeing of individuals and populations affected by ocean conditions? Applying systems-based approaches, we focus on nutrition, food-security, toxicity and health risk assessments.

Law of the Sea and Governance

We study the legal and political implications of the Law of the Sea and the international ocean governance processes.

About Nereus

Working towards a sustainable future for the ocean and the people who rely on it.

The Nippon Foundation Nereus Program is a global partnership of 20 leading institutes working to advance our comprehensive understanding of the global human-ocean system across the natural and social sciences. Our research spans from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. Since our inception in 2011, we have engaged in innovative, international ocean research.

We pursue sustainability in a way that observes the location, identity, context, and history of the communities we work with as diversities to be embraced rather than differences to be overcome.