The Link Between People And The Sea

Our Work

Many marine organisms have evolved unique and rare adaptations to allow them to survive in some of the most extreme and varied environments on earth. The genetic sequences responsible for these traits could have applications in anything from pharmaceuticals to biofuels.
Fish are being driven from their territory at a rate of 70 km per decade, which could accelerate. In a paper published in Science yesterday, an interdisciplinary team of Nereus researchers describe how many species will be pushed across national and other political boundaries in the coming decades.
Small-scale fisheries are vital to communities around the world, but their value is severely underestimated. Hear more about their importance to global catch and culture from experts at the Nereus Program, WorldFish, FAO and Duke.
The most prevalent seafood supply chain is the shortest one: from the ocean to the plate. And that’s the one we have the least information on. Small-scale fisheries are vital to coastal communities around the world, but their contributions to global harvests are severely underestimated.
Who controls the narrative on the environment? Nereus researchers have been delving deeper into work on coastal Indigenous fisheries and as they develop relationships with Indigenous community members around the world, some are starting to rethink many of the core concepts of ocean governance.
The excitement around Sustainable Development Goals has faded somewhat since the United Nations meeting in 2015, and now comes the less inspiring dirty work of analysis and policy-setting to achieve them.
What happens to big prey when you fish out all of their big predators? Nereus researchers dig deeper into size-specific diet shifts.
What is socially responsible seafood and what can you do about it? Hear from the experts at the Nereus Program, Fair Trade USA, Sustainable Fisheries Partnership and the International Labor Rights Forum.
Many marine organisms have evolved unique and rare adaptations to allow them to survive in some of the most extreme and varied environments on earth. The genetic sequences responsible for these traits could have applications in anything from pharmaceuticals to biofuels.
Fish are being driven from their territory at a rate of 70 km per decade, which could accelerate. In a paper published in Science yesterday, an interdisciplinary team of Nereus researchers describe how many species will be pushed across national and other political boundaries in the coming decades.
The most prevalent seafood supply chain is the shortest one: from the ocean to the plate. And that’s the one we have the least information on. Small-scale fisheries are vital to coastal communities around the world, but their contributions to global harvests are severely underestimated.
What happens to big prey when you fish out all of their big predators? Nereus researchers dig deeper into size-specific diet shifts.
Behind the scenes with a determined group of human rights and fisheries experts working to bring social responsibility to the forefront of sustainable fishing.
On April 3rd, 2018, tribal representatives, students and academics gathered to discuss a pressing issue for coastal indigenous communities of the Pacific Northwest: the future of the fish they’ve relied on since time immemorial.
Nereus Program Principal Investigator Malin Pinsky (Rutgers University) has published a commentary in PNAS on research regarding climate vulnerability and resilience in the American lobster fishery.
Global Fishing Watch, a project that combines machine learning and big data techniques to map industrial fishing activities, was published in new research in Science last week by Nereus collaborators Kroodsma et al.
Who controls the narrative on the environment? Nereus researchers have been delving deeper into work on coastal Indigenous fisheries and as they develop relationships with Indigenous community members around the world, some are starting to rethink many of the core concepts of ocean governance.
The excitement around Sustainable Development Goals has faded somewhat since the United Nations meeting in 2015, and now comes the less inspiring dirty work of analysis and policy-setting to achieve them.
Sustainable marine fisheries seem to tick all the boxes. They can fill your belly, fill your wallet, and do it all for a fraction of carbon emmissions generated by conventional agriculture. Getting marine fisheries "right" could also help to reduce the loss of biodiversity in the ocean, and increase equity among coastal populations.
The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in Australia, Fiji and New Zealand, in partnership with US-based tech innovator ConsenSys, tech implementer TraSeable and tuna fishing and processing company Sea Quest Fiji Ltd, has just launched a pilot project in the Pacific Islands tuna industry that will use blockchain technology to track the journey of tuna from “bait to plate”.
By Andrés Cisneros-Montemayor, Nereus Program Manager and Research Associate From shore you can see the windmills that provide electricity to the whole town, just behind the desalination plant that supplies freshwater to most of the region. The adjacent bay is where the fishing boats—fishing sustainably, of course—come to unload at the seafood processing centers that take in both wild captured fish and the products from integrated mariculture, where multiple species are grown, simulating an ecosystem. This is the vision for the Blue Economy fostered by the World Bank, the UN, and some of the largest global financial and conservation foundations.
By Robert Blasiak, Nereus Program Fellow at Stockholm Resilience Centre Fachidiot! This wonderfully direct word from the German language describes a person who knows their subject (Fach), and nothing else. It was on my mind recently as I read articles in a new special issue of the journal Ecology & Society on “Reconciling Art and Science for Sustainability”. The issue is filled with contributions from scientists and artists who have in some sense travelled into unknown and unfamiliar territory, and discovered along the way that this was feeding innovation and adding value to their work.
Women working in natural resource extraction face many challenges, which hinders countries in efforts towards sustainable development and from achieving gender equality. This is especially true in the context of small-scale fishing communities.
When the European Space Agency (ESA) launched a satellite into orbit on Oct. 13, it did so despite opposition from Inuit leaders in Canada and Greenland over its potential to contaminate an important Arctic area.
Small-scale fisheries are vital to communities around the world, but their value is severely underestimated. Hear more about their importance to global catch and culture from experts at the Nereus Program, WorldFish, FAO and Duke.
What is socially responsible seafood and what can you do about it? Hear from the experts at the Nereus Program, Fair Trade USA, Sustainable Fisheries Partnership and the International Labor Rights Forum.
Sustainable? Wild? Local? Seafood consumption can be difficult to follow. So we asked ocean scientists from The Nereus Program to stop floundering and tell us whether it's okay to eat fish, and if so, which.

Research

Global Environmental Changes

We are deepening our understanding of the relationship between our changing climate and the human-ocean ecosystem through the study of oceanography, chemistry, ecosystem modeling, applied mathematics and computing.

Marine Resource Management

We engage in applied research with clear policy implications on how humans use ocean resources. Our work hones in on the ecological, socioeconomic, political and cultural factors that shape marine resource use.

Social Equity for Oceans

We are working to address inequity and social injustice in ocean management by studying the socio-cultural implications of environmental changes, conservation burdens of various fisheries policies and socially responsible seafood consumption.

Oceans and Public Health

How are the health and wellbeing of individuals and populations affected by ocean conditions? Applying systems-based approaches, we focus on nutrition, food-security, toxicity and health risk assessments.

Law of the Sea and Governance

We study the legal and political implications of the Law of the Sea and the international ocean governance processes.

About

The Nereus Program is an interdisciplinary marine research organization working towards a sustainable future for the world's oceans and the people who rely on it.

Since our inception in 2011, we have engaged in innovative, international ocean research. The Nereus Program is a global partnership of 20 leading institutes working to advance our comprehensive understanding of the global human-ocean system across the natural and social sciences. Our research spans from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. We pursue sustainability in a way that observes the location, identity, context, and history of the communities we work with as diversities to be embraced rather than differences to be overcome.

Entomology: Our program is named for the eldest son of Pontos and Gaea, the sea and earth deities of Greek mythology. Nereus was the patron of ocean bounty was known for his ability to foresee changes in the ocean. Like our namesake, we hope to shed light on the future of the world's oceans and to be the link between people and the sea.