The Link Between People And The Sea

Nippon Foundation
Nereus Science Conference:
Predicting Future Oceans

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Sea-ing the People

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Best Practices for Regional Fisheries Conservation and Management

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The Sargassum Mass-Bloom of 2018

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Legal Considerations Around Japan’s Announcement That it Will Leave the International Whaling Commission (IWC)

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News

Congratulations to principal investigator Larry Crowder for receiving the International Sea Turtle Society (ISTS) Lifetime Achievement Award for his work with sea turtle conservation and biology.
New Ph.D. opportunity at Australian National University, based in the Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science (CPAS) studying the role of gender, equity and inclusion in participatory research approaches to improve management and ocean sustainability. See inside for full project and application details.
Congratulations to Nereus research fellow Guillermo Ortuño Crespo for successfully defending his Ph.D. dissertation! Here you can read the summary he wrote about his research, as well as his future directions.
Research associate Juan José Alava (UBC) is lead author on a new study published in Frontiers in Marine Science that measures persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and mercury levels in bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador.
ASU-CI Nexus is hiring a Post-Doctoral Fellow in sustainable oceans to help assess the global prevalence of human rights abuses in the seafood sector, with a focus on wild-capture fisheries. There is a May 1, 2020 deadline, and you can read the full description and access the application portal here.
Seeking a highly motivated postdoc at Memorial University to join a team investigating ecosystem dynamics in Newfoundland, Labrador, and the Arctic. Details and contact information within.
The International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) awarded Guillermo Ortuño Crespo the runner-up prize for seafood sustainability, for his proposal "Dynamic Habitat Predictions of Two Bycaught Oceanic Shark Species."
Tyler Eddy is a co-author on a new study in Nature's Scientific Reports that uses raw video footage of Rangitāhua (Kermadec Islands) filmed for the documentary "Our Big Blue Backyard" to learn more about the remote area's rich shallow reef biodiversity.
Congratulations to principal investigator Larry Crowder for receiving the International Sea Turtle Society (ISTS) Lifetime Achievement Award for his work with sea turtle conservation and biology.
New Ph.D. opportunity at Australian National University, based in the Australian National Centre for the Public Awareness of Science (CPAS) studying the role of gender, equity and inclusion in participatory research approaches to improve management and ocean sustainability. See inside for full project and application details.
Congratulations to Nereus research fellow Guillermo Ortuño Crespo for successfully defending his Ph.D. dissertation! Here you can read the summary he wrote about his research, as well as his future directions.
Research associate Juan José Alava (UBC) is lead author on a new study published in Frontiers in Marine Science that measures persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and mercury levels in bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador.
ASU-CI Nexus is hiring a Post-Doctoral Fellow in sustainable oceans to help assess the global prevalence of human rights abuses in the seafood sector, with a focus on wild-capture fisheries. There is a May 1, 2020 deadline, and you can read the full description and access the application portal here.
Seeking a highly motivated postdoc at Memorial University to join a team investigating ecosystem dynamics in Newfoundland, Labrador, and the Arctic. Details and contact information within.
The International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) awarded Guillermo Ortuño Crespo the runner-up prize for seafood sustainability, for his proposal "Dynamic Habitat Predictions of Two Bycaught Oceanic Shark Species."
Tyler Eddy is a co-author on a new study in Nature's Scientific Reports that uses raw video footage of Rangitāhua (Kermadec Islands) filmed for the documentary "Our Big Blue Backyard" to learn more about the remote area's rich shallow reef biodiversity.
Nereus alumnus Robert Blasiak (Stockholm Resilience Centre) wrote an article for The Conversation about the newest publication he co-authored concerning the Blue Acceleration. You can read it and access the original article here.
Nereus Program research associate Juan José Alava (UBC) wrote a blog for The Conversation about the rise in mercury concentrations in top marine predators due to climate change and overfishing, and the effect this has on human health, the fishing industry, and marine food webs.
School of Marine and Environmental Affairs (SMEA) master's student Sallie Lau (University of Washington) wrote a blog about her experience at the recent Nippon Foundation Nereus Science Conference. Both English and Chinese versions are posted here.
School of Marine and Environmental Affairs (SMEA) master's student Karin Otsuka (University of Washington) wrote a blog about her experience at the Nippon Foundation Nereus Program Ocean Science Conference in September, as well as her research this past summer in Miyakojima, Okinawa, Japan.
Leah Burrows (Science and Technology Communications Officer) of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) wrote an article about Elsie Sunderland's and Colin Thackray's recent publication on methylmercury bioaccumulation in marine predators for The Harvard Gazette.
Nereus research associate Lydia Teh (UBC) writes a blog about her and other Nereus colleagues attending the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research Conference (IMBeR) Future Oceans Open Science Conference in Brest, France.
Nereus Fellow Zoë Kitchel (Rutgers University) writes about fellows Katy Seto, Julia Mason, Tiff-Annie Kenny, Becca Selden and Harriet Harden-Davies discussing critically important themes concerning equity and interdisciplinarity in relation to how the ocean is studied at the United Nations building, during an Open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law of the Sea.
Nereus alumnus Rebecca Asch (East Carolina University) writes a blog about her upcoming publication in the journal Global Change Biology, which focuses on how climate change is influencing seasonality, thereby creating critical mismatches in the timing between fish spawning and phytoplankton blooms in marine food webs.

Research

Global Environmental Changes

We are deepening our understanding of the relationship between our changing climate and the human-ocean ecosystem through the study of oceanography, chemistry, ecosystem modeling, applied mathematics and computing.

Marine Resource Management

We engage in applied research with clear policy implications on how humans use ocean resources. Our work hones in on the ecological, socioeconomic, political and cultural factors that shape marine resource use.

Social Equity for Oceans

We are working to address inequity and social injustice in ocean management by studying the socio-cultural implications of environmental changes, conservation burdens of various fisheries policies and socially responsible seafood consumption.

Oceans and Public Health

How are the health and wellbeing of individuals and populations affected by ocean conditions? Applying systems-based approaches, we focus on nutrition, food-security, toxicity and health risk assessments.

Law of the Sea and Governance

We study the legal and political implications of the Law of the Sea and the international ocean governance processes.

About Nereus

Working towards a sustainable future for the ocean and the people who rely on it.

The Nippon Foundation Nereus Program is a global partnership of 17 leading institutes working to advance our comprehensive understanding of the global human-ocean system across the natural and social sciences. Our research spans from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. Since our inception in 2011, we have engaged in innovative, international ocean research.
We pursue sustainability in a way that observes the location, identity, context, and history of the communities we work with as diversities to be embraced rather than differences to be overcome.