The Link Between People And The Sea

News

A new report was just released from the workshop 'From visions to scenarios for nature and nature's contributions to people for the 21st century', which was co-organized by Nereus Program, Peter Wall Institute, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services's (IPBES).
Research fellows Harriet Harden-Davies (University of Wollongong/ANCORS) and Guillermo Ortuño Crespo (Duke University) with Daniel Dunn (Duke University) are co-authors on a policy brief published by IDDRI that aims to strengthen the current high seas management and governance framework to improve marine conservation and sustainability.
Leah Burrows (Science and Technology Communications Officer) of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) wrote an article about Elsie Sunderland's and Colin Thackray's recent publication on methylmercury bioaccumulation in marine predators for The Harvard Gazette.
Colin Thackray (Harvard University) and Elsie Sunderland (Harvard University) are co-authors with others on a new publication that models how climate change and overfishing are contributing to the bioaccumulation of neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg) in top ocean predators, some of which are commonly consumed species of seafood.
Nereus research fellow Harriet Harden-Davies (University of Wollongong/ANCORS) and Rashid Sumaila (UBC) are co-authors on a new paper published in Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems that identifies necessary measures to restore ocean health for future generations.
Nereus research associate Colette Wabnitz (UBC) recently appeared in a Reuters article, 'Toxic seaweed a menace to Caribbean tourists'.
In her new publication, Nereus Fellow Sarah Roberts (Ph.D. Candidate at Duke University) finds that several fish species’ responses to ocean warming in the North Atlantic depend on the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO).
Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) has published the article 'The roles of nongovernmental actors in improving compliance with fisheries regulations' in the Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law.
A new report was just released from the workshop 'From visions to scenarios for nature and nature's contributions to people for the 21st century', which was co-organized by Nereus Program, Peter Wall Institute, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services's (IPBES).
Research fellows Harriet Harden-Davies (University of Wollongong/ANCORS) and Guillermo Ortuño Crespo (Duke University) with Daniel Dunn (Duke University) are co-authors on a policy brief published by IDDRI that aims to strengthen the current high seas management and governance framework to improve marine conservation and sustainability.
Colin Thackray (Harvard University) and Elsie Sunderland (Harvard University) are co-authors with others on a new publication that models how climate change and overfishing are contributing to the bioaccumulation of neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg) in top ocean predators, some of which are commonly consumed species of seafood.
Nereus research fellow Harriet Harden-Davies (University of Wollongong/ANCORS) and Rashid Sumaila (UBC) are co-authors on a new paper published in Aquatic Conservation: Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems that identifies necessary measures to restore ocean health for future generations.
Nereus research associate Colette Wabnitz (UBC) recently appeared in a Reuters article, 'Toxic seaweed a menace to Caribbean tourists'.
In her new publication, Nereus Fellow Sarah Roberts (Ph.D. Candidate at Duke University) finds that several fish species’ responses to ocean warming in the North Atlantic depend on the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO).
Solène Guggisberg (Utrecht University) has published the article 'The roles of nongovernmental actors in improving compliance with fisheries regulations' in the Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law.
Nereus research fellow Kisei Tanaka (Princeton University) accepted a position as Research Scientist in the Conservation & Science department at Monterey Bay Aquarium, starting in August 2019.
Leah Burrows (Science and Technology Communications Officer) of the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) wrote an article about Elsie Sunderland's and Colin Thackray's recent publication on methylmercury bioaccumulation in marine predators for The Harvard Gazette.
Nereus research associate Lydia Teh (UBC) writes a blog about her and other Nereus colleagues attending the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research Conference (IMBeR) Future Oceans Open Science Conference in Brest, France.
Nereus Fellow Zoë Kitchel (Rutgers University) writes about fellows Katy Seto, Julia Mason, Tiff-Annie Kenny, Becca Selden and Harriet Harden-Davies discussing critically important themes concerning equity and interdisciplinarity in relation to how the ocean is studied at the United Nations building, during an Open-ended Informal Consultative Process on Oceans and the Law of the Sea.
Nereus alumnus Rebecca Asch (East Carolina University) writes a blog about her upcoming publication in the journal Global Change Biology, which focuses on how climate change is influencing seasonality, thereby creating critical mismatches in the timing between fish spawning and phytoplankton blooms in marine food webs.
Nereus Program Manager/Research Associate Vicky Lam (University of British Columbia) wrote a blog about using a modeling approach and scenario analysis to help project future biodiversity and ecological scenarios and identify approaches to achieve long-term ecological, economic and socially sustainable ways to utilize marine resources.
Nereus Fellow Matilda Petersson (Stockholm Resilience Centre) wrote a blog about her most recent research and publication concerning non-state actor participation in tuna Regional Fisheries Management Organization (RFMO) committee meetings, and their influence on decision-making.
Nereus Fellow Kisei Tanaka (Princeton University) writes a blog about species' suitability to their surrounding habitat and how traditional ecological models take into account a species' habitat preference and known geographic distribution. His research focuses on incorporating species' evolutionary aspects and adaptations into models, to better reflect their suitability to a changing habitat and environment.
Nereus Research Associate Colette Wabnitz (University of British Columbia) wrote a blog about the Sargassum mass bloom event that occurred in 2018, and how it impacted countries throughout the Caribbean. She discusses the origins of Sargassum, factors that trigger mass blooms, and what can be done about it.

Research

Global Environmental Changes

We are deepening our understanding of the relationship between our changing climate and the human-ocean ecosystem through the study of oceanography, chemistry, ecosystem modeling, applied mathematics and computing.

Marine Resource Management

We engage in applied research with clear policy implications on how humans use ocean resources. Our work hones in on the ecological, socioeconomic, political and cultural factors that shape marine resource use.

Social Equity for Oceans

We are working to address inequity and social injustice in ocean management by studying the socio-cultural implications of environmental changes, conservation burdens of various fisheries policies and socially responsible seafood consumption.

Oceans and Public Health

How are the health and wellbeing of individuals and populations affected by ocean conditions? Applying systems-based approaches, we focus on nutrition, food-security, toxicity and health risk assessments.

Law of the Sea and Governance

We study the legal and political implications of the Law of the Sea and the international ocean governance processes.

About Nereus

Working towards a sustainable future for the ocean and the people who rely on it.

The Nippon Foundation Nereus Program is a global partnership of 20 leading institutes working to advance our comprehensive understanding of the global human-ocean system across the natural and social sciences. Our research spans from oceanography and marine ecology to fisheries economics and impacts on coastal communities. Since our inception in 2011, we have engaged in innovative, international ocean research.

We pursue sustainability in a way that observes the location, identity, context, and history of the communities we work with as diversities to be embraced rather than differences to be overcome.